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I think that the only reason India should be invested in is to improve its economy. This clip is great because it reveals the thruth about the Desi society. I also think it is neat how MTV saw a way to capitalize by naming its “Asian” programming MTV Desi giving it a chance to appeal to the South Asian poplation as well as the Desi populuation.

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Anyone can see by watching this video clip that each one of the members of the household are treating her disrespectfully and by the comments made it can be assumed that she is being “bullied” due to her race. I do not believe that your school you attedn affects how you act towards other cultures, it is youur upbringing. It does not matter if your are higher class or lower class, if you were raised in a racist famliy then there are strong chances that when you get older you will have hose same views as your parents did.

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[…] In Media Res » Blog Archive » Heroes and Comic Book Aesthetics Heroes and comic book style. Also includes some further reading at the end of the text part. (tags: heroes comics writing television) […]

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Jason Mittell

A little production history adds another level here - Khandi Alexander left the show after three seasons, allegedly because she felt marginalized on the show, with the character always in the background & the (white) writers unable to make any real storylines for her. So Catherine’s complaints about being surrounded by white people probably rang true behind the scenes as well…

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Kathleen Fitzpatrick

It would be interesting to get students to talk some about what happens in the gap between the program and the commercial. There are any number of interesting possibilities: the problem of “skin” and “equality” is rewritten as a beauty problem (i.e., one that’s only skin-deep) rather than a system of racial oppression; the corporate world steps forward with a solution to this problem (if your skin looked like Andie MacDowell’s, you wouldn’t be in this predicament!); etc. The most interesting angle of approach for me (right this very second, as I type), though, is the complete inversion of expectations about factuality and fictionality across the program/commercial border. Which one is composed of pure fantasy? Which one speaks about the world in which we actually live?

Very rich clip. Thanks for this!

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[…] But in one of the most interesting examples of a media mashup, a point is made that the process begins with deconstruction of content, then putting it together in a way that forms a new idea. The MediaCommons Project’s In Media Res has a mashup called “The Last Lion King of Scotland“, a video that uses footage from “The Lion King” and soundtrack clips from “The Last King of Scotland” (yes, it does sound odd, and it is!). […]

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Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Fantastic clip. I remember seeing this as a kid, when it first aired, and being utterly blown away by it. (And also swept into bed, away from such dangerous “adult” television.)

The thing that’s most shocking about it now is hearing someone say “abortion used to be a dirty word. It’s not now!” That certainly seems long ago and far away…

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Jonathan Gray

Agreed, Shanti — when I first heard about the incident and quickly headed to the Brit press to read about it, I was hit by a wave of commentary (editorial and multiple online reponses) on The Guardian by middle class Britons reading Goody’s racism as a sign of the failure of Thatcher’s gouging at the public education system. Though I have no interest in defending Thatcher, it seemed too convenient to pawn this off as working class ignorance, as if better schools for the working class would “solve” racism. And yet, as with the recent Imus affair this side of the Atlantic, the ritualistic display of We Are Not Racist, O Praise Us hit such fever pitch

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Avi Santo

great clip,Susan. I’ve also shown this clip in one of my classes and gotten eerily similar reactions. Many of my students find shows like South Park, The Chappelle Show , and Mind of Mencia to be their preferred spaces for encountering challenging and taboo political subject matter precisely because they are not “preachy” and seem to address issues from an ironic/”the lesson is self-evident” position. I wonder how this scenario would play out today if handled by Sarah Silverman ?

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Avi Santo

Yes, I didn’t mean my comment in contradiction, actually I was thinking in compliment. It strikes me that given your observations, and honestly I hadn’t noticed so I am sort of improvising here, that despite the selling of “edginess” by Showtime and HBO one finds surprisingly normative even to some extent hyperized gender roles (I think Queer as Folk or L-word might complicate this, but then again might not). I was also thinking of the way that SaTC ended in a completely gender normative pattern: the over sexualized woman got cancer, the career woman turns domestic, the mother gets her child, and the central character rejects the foreign for the domestic. But, given the trends which you point to here perhaps this is not as surprising as it might initially seem.