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Here is an irony. While most other countries have already seen the last episodes of the Sopranos we in England are still waiting. Ireland will probably get these episodes before us - we heard last night that they are airing in Brazil. Why this long wait. Sorry to Douglas for using his column to rant about this but it would be nice if we could comment on this episode. Are we still in the dark ages in Britain? Is it money that dictates our screening schedules? Or, is it just plain mean of Channel 4 to hold onto these episodes as long as possible?

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You are absolutely right, feminism is probably last on Chase’s list of priorities when writing these scenes but they do show a relationship between women (particularly mother and daughter) that replicates how judgemental feminism can be. Who needs men to judge us when we do a really good job on ourselves?

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I believe Tony does feel bad, but he also has a tendency to displace his guilt (e.g., when he learned that his former goomara Gloria committed suicide, he spent the rest of the episode trying to save his other friends). By this point in the third season, Tony has clashed with Meadow over her boyfriend Noah because he is part African American. Tony’s guilt about Leon may be compounded by his guilt about Noah. So when he offers Leon the money, he’s not only attempting to fix the damage he inflicted on Leon but also repair his strained relationship with Meadow. Perhaps that’s why we see him navigating his way through idealized female sculptures? They could represent his beloved daughter.

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Chris Boulton

Thanks for your responses!

On the secular psychology tip, it may interest you to know that Porn Nation publicizes every visit by pointing students to an online “sex survey” so that they might self-diagnose their level of “sexual addiction.” 24,000 undergrads have taken the survey thus far and can check out the entire survey here: http://www.mysexsurvey.com/

Of course, Porn Nation is often sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ. So, after quasi-science establishes the problem, evangelists offer up faith as the solution.

CB

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Maurice Yacowar

Old Proverb: S/he who toucheth pitch is defiled. Or is it the Stockholm Syndrome: assigned to cover Tony, Harris shifts into identifying with him. The seed is planted in Season One when Harris brings his new partner around to Satriale’s to intro him to T and they jaw basketball. The process was inexorable after that. My fave FBI scenes: Ade’s upchuck; the plumber’s son predicting T’s tank blowout in 6 mos and it hits within a day; the honorable officers intermittent Horn Dog chat about Ade and her ‘friend’. Of course Tony regards any FBI agent with a vowel-end name as a turncoat (Talk about Italian-American stereotypy!). So Harrisgoes t’other way. In the last episode Harris’s conversion parallels Meadow’s, AJ’s, Patsy’s. The theme is T’s triumph over those who might have escaped his pitch. So we don’t see the two who did: Melfi and the Buccos.

Maurice Yacowar

Say what you will, but only he in that inspired landscape merited a visit from The Virgin Mary — in The Bing. After hours. And he provoked some plausible spirits at a seance, after that message from Chris’s dip into the afterlife. So the most brutish gangmember seems to have some antenna going out there. In the Last Episode speculations many figured Phil Leotardo spared Paulie to have him whack Tony, but his earlier betrayals perhaps argued against that. Fascinating character.

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Maurice Yacowar

Yes but… Carmela doesn’t have a lawyer; T has poisoned the well—or from wherever the show’s shysters are dredged. In that scene M even holds Finn up as a model for Carmela, someone who got a job — but T got it for him. As Finn’s father got Meadow her California job the next summer. And as Chris sets up Adriana’s business….etc. I’m not sure feminism is Chase’s issue so much as morality. Livia, Charmaine and Angie Bonpensiero (as she develops) seem to be very strong assertive women who stand apart from feminism. None work out of any sense of sisterhood. They all establish their options, no? The closest Chase gives us to a sisterhood might be the wives’ filmwatchers club, which works thru the AFI Greats List till No 3 Godfather bogs them down. But that’s a parody of sisterhood. At the end Meadow has matured right back into the Family she rebelled against. She’s marrying a nice Parisi but a Parisi — and whose uncle T had whacked — and she’ll follow the champion of justice into the law firm that’s ensuring Justice for the hounded bagmen and bigtime fraudsters. Like Doris Day wide-eyed in A Touch of Neil Mink mayhap?

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Chuck Tryon

Tama, this is a really interesting “find.” I certainly remember the rewriting of many trailers and movies after 9/11, but the Spider-Man case is especially interesting, especially given the second film’s explicit references to the terrorist attacks.

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Jonathan Gray

Not sure how much my comment relates to this specific clip, but I wonder about national (sexual) identity here, too. Many aspects of Canadianness (in its stereotypical polite version that is, not the drunk hockey fan or lumberjack mind you) are somewhat effeminate by nature, and more subdued than ideals of American masculinity dictate. And even some Canadian male icons, such as Wayne Gretzky or Joe Sakic, are loved in part for being quasi-feminine in conduct, not warrior/cavemen type guys. So perhaps sexual identity bisects (wow — i’m proud of that pun!) national identities too?

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Jonathan Gray

I’m fascinated by how a lot of ads like this try to sell such conspicuous and over the top signs of privilege and control: being able to tell women to shake their “junks” and so forth.

Here, the fantasy of control and power is so redundant, since the dude with the Amp’d Up is already coded as the privileged one by race and clothing: he hardly needs the phone. Maybe then, the advertisers pounced on the wrong racialized myth, trying to speak to the desire to control rather than the desire to escape “the urban jungle” (ie: the desire that walkmen, ipods, and PSPs seemed to offer, even if not in explicit terms at all times). The latter is realizable after all — mobile media *can* help transport one out of the humdrum of a long commute — but the former is either already present (as with middle class white dude on the bus here. did his car break down today?) or not at all promiseable.