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This commercial is something that I could actually see shown on American televison. As others have commented, I am not sure why they used Jack from the popular American TV show “24.” Maybe this is a huge hit in Japan as well becuse it seemed as if they used Jack’s character in the context of the Japanese culture by utilizing glocalization and not cultural imperialism. Almost everything shown within the commercial actually reflects the daily Japanese life. For example, the subway system is one of the most prominent ways to travel in Japan, it is part of the daily Japanese life in the major cities of Japan. Also, the school outfits the female high school students were wearing are actually school attire the students wear over there. However, they did manage to incorporate the American style by adding suspenseful music and the faced paced camera movement editing to make it seem very action oriented.

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This concept of having a Reality TV in a War Zone in Iraq is much different than the type of Reality TV shows that are aired here in the U.S. In the U.S. most of the reality shows are solely created to gain higher ratings and for financial purposes. This show in Iraq seems to approach their reality programming for a much better cause, perhaps to show their nationalistic pride and help out the communities that have been devastated by the war. These Iraqi civilians are actually living this “reality,” unlike the American reality shows that are targetted and heavily edited to meet the demands of a specific audience. Whereas, this show is targetted for everybody in Iraq because of the situation they are currently in. Moreover, in a way, this show does kind of reflect the American reality TV show “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.” In which, this show did use some of the conventional approaches such as helping out the people who have been affected the most, showing their emotional emotional response, all in order to bring the people together.

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This commercial shows how marketing strategies are used to promote products. In watching this commercial, I feel that it is very beneficial to cultural values. I am happy to see that the heterosexual man does not look at the school girl in a sexual way. He continues on his journey in order to find this energy drink that will keep him going. The commercial markets the drink and the show 24. I do feel that this commercial is not that realistic because it is possible that if this was another male, he might look at the school girls. This questions how a global market has come together to make a local product well know to audiences. Globalization has help to make this commercial a success. I am glad that this commercial promotes the drink, the show 24, and the strength of a man.

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Based off of this clip, I will have to agree and say that not being exposed to different races early on can shelter individuals. Research does support that higher social classes affect a person’s race and how they are viewed by others in society. This show explains how race can play a factor into socialization. Although I feel this way, in the clip, I do not feel that they are necessarily picking on this individuals race. I do feel that when a lot of females live together, there are always conflicting situations. Even though, I have not seen the whole episode, I feel that there many be cases where the girl who was being picked on will retaliate.

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This advertisement also brings to mind the whole concept of cultural imperialism. I thought it was entertaining to see at the end of the clip the cute little Japanese girl side by side with Jack Bauer both consuming the oh so good- calorie mate. This commercial really could have been shot anywhere. If you took out the Japanese girls and replaced them with (fill in the blank) girls, then it would have gotten the same idea across. There was no real sense of being in Japan besides the teenage girls.

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The clip of the Reality TV in a War Zone is very interesting. Not only does this focus on the “real” Iraq cultural, but it also teach us a lesson. In watching the clip, I found it interesting that the female was skeptical about taking the offer; however, she does show how the cultural really is. When she tries to restore the destroyed neighborhood, it seems as if she is enjoys helping out the community. As the audience takes a tour of the community, we actually witness what and how the community looks. Although there are images on television that the media portray, we are not certain that these images reveal everything. I feel that the idea of a reality television show for the war zone can be helpful and harmful. This show can help individual see what actually occurs in Iraq globally, however, it can be harmful for those who are exposed in such living conditions. Overall, I feel that there are advantages and disadvantages to the reality show.

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I found it interesting the many snippets of scenes from American movies and American themes. President Bush singing to the tune of the Beach Boys, “bomb,bomb, Iran,” Ben Stiller, Doris Day, and the famous Ten Commandent Scene with Charlton Heston… Although this clip definitely showed Italy’s social and political beliefs, it also demonstrated the Western influence on Italy’s media.

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This can definetly be seen as a uniting force for the Iraqi nation. Reality television in this sense is actually “reality” like Corina commented on- real people struggling in a time of war. The content is much deeper and authentic than most American reality shows. Taking a global genre like this and applying it locally- specifically targeting the needs of the people of Iraq will hopefully have a strong influence on other countries. I would have loved to see a televison show that focused and helped all the Hurrican Katrina victims who lost their home.

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Avi Santo

but I wonder, Chris, if Stewart’s efforts, in some ways, don’t further prove Paula’s point about Americans lacking empathy. Why must we need an intermediary, no less a white male suffering from liberal guilt like Stewart, through whom to experience rage or sorrow for other people’s losses? Why can’t their rage and sorrow be enough? Why is it that when Stewart asks these questions, Iraqis are humanized, but images of angry, crying, or screaming Iraqis only make us more afraid?

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Chris Boulton

Thanks Paula. Here’s a couple of thoughts;

1. For a country that elected a President to protect the so-called “culture of life,” we sure do fudge the numbers: trading in 5,000 Kurds to justify the death of hundreds of thousands. When it comes to Darfur, the Tsunami, and yes, 9/11, our foriegn policy just doesn’t add up.

2. Clearly, American apathy is due to a combination of physical distance, cultural misapprehension, racism, and a blissful denial of our military and economic impact around the world…a tough code to crack.

3. On a brighter note, Jon Stewart, a frat boy favorite, recently tried to bridge the divide when he asked how Ali Allawi how Iraq deals with having a “Virginia Tech” everyday:

http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/04272007/transcript1.html