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Reality TV in the U.S. and Canada obviously have a different objective than that of the Iraqui show. Most of the reality TV in the U.S. has one main purpose, which is entertaining and making a profit. The Iraqui show seems to want to uplift or empower Iraqui nationalism. They have taken the reality TV, made it serve as a tool to show different images of themselves. They are showing their humanity and how the war affects many innocent people in their country. It exciting to see that reality TV has the potential to open up the eyes of people that are constantly bombarded with negative images of a nation.

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I agree with Tyler that it is acceptable for hip hop to become a “fragrant” global commodity. Though it may be viewed as a “musical style” and perhaps an “art form” based in African Amercian culture, I am curious as to what reasons are behind its popularity and positioning as a global commodity, and whether it’s related to a common ground of the desire/need to express struggle, an appreciation of the rhythms and dance styles incorporated, or perhaps some combination?

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I agree that this commercial seems highly “Americanized” in several ways, from the lead actor. However, I do not think that the commercial is, as previous comments have mentioned, “completely” American, but rather an act of glocalization and cultural hybridity, due to the incorporation of both Japanese actors, language (at least, in regards to the females present), and culture. On the other hand, I see how this may arguably be a good case for cultural imperialism, too, as not only the nature of the product being marketed, but also the film style, from the choice of an American actor in the lead role to the film style, playing on “24” is depicted.

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After watching this clip, for the second time, in fact, I agree that it does use a direct, “in-your-face” shock value style to make it’s points. However, it seems that the speaker has not, perhaps, taken into account the possibility that not every “Desi” neccessarily desires and yearns for this connection with “the homeland.” I agree that while this complicates the assumptions about relationships between Desi’s and India, it is important to take into account the potentially equivalent or greater desire to connect with “American” culture, though that term may be difficult to be definite boundaries around.

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In resonse to Avi Santo’s question regarding whether or not hip hop should become a “fragrant” global commodity, I think that it is acceptable to do so. Yes it is a part of music that was created with American culture with African Americans reflecting thier stuggles in life and culture, but there is no reason why hip hop can not be used around the world to represent the same thing I believe. This clip is an example of how these two dancers were critized about thier look, from thier hair to the way they pointed thier toes to the way they dances different from the other dancers in the compitition. The struggles they went through in the comptition were reflected in thier dance and they made a statement and spoke thier mind without the use of words, but through dance and the hip hop beats and music.

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I dont think that she was being attacked due to her race in this clip. And I agree with others before, if she did believe she was being attacked due to her race and voiced her oppinion then why take it back? It was obviously on tape, but with these reality shows you have to take into account how much editing is done and how people are portayed. Shilpa is obviously from the looks of this clip, the minority in the house and when she is the minority she may feel that every little thing she does wrong or someone bring up to her in a point is due to her race. It is hard to tell just from watching this one clip if Shilpa was indeed undergoing racism but over chicken stock cubes, im not so sure that is racism, but just a complicated and pointless arguement.

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I agree with Karla above. This commerical is Americanized. From the actor, to the show he is representing to the feel of the product, it all is representing American culter being meshed into the Japanese culture. It just seems ironic to me that a country who is seen as relitively healthy in thier eating habits would need a product that we see too often in American culture, diet drinks and supplements. It seems like an act of glocalization to me.

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I thought what these two Israeli hip-hop dancers did was fantastic. They stood up for themselves with their art which made it even more personal for them. There is some truth that hip-hop is a global commodity just like with a lot of things being passed around the world. Hip-hop is an art form and it is taught in many schools and has been appropriated by many, therefore it is a global commodity. It does express struggles and the Israeli dancers were able to use the dance form to do just that, which is acceptable for any dancer despite their culture or race. Hip-hop has the fragrance of African-American culture with it because of where it originated from and that is not going to change. Hip-hop has become a global commodity just like these reality TV formats have. Every country just about has their own twist or version of a particular reality show nowadays. The show is supposed to represent that country and Israel with this dance show was represented by two hip-hop dancers that were Israelis. They should not be overlooked or treated any differently. What is very interesting about this show is it brought awareness to the inner tension that the country has with its own shades of people. There are a lot of people who feel like Dvir and that’s just toxic.

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––––––––––––––––––––––––––— Well if you put everything into context, for one this is a reality show and the whole premise is to put a bunch of different people together and let them have at it. Of course when the show was over there were going to be allegations of racism or “racist bullying” because the housemates were all of varied cultures and races. Therefore, of course attacks that were made could have been interpreted as racist. However, I don’t know if some of the housemates were racist or was Shilpa just an easy target for a number of reasons. The reality is some people do have strong beliefs against others and that is in every society. If anything this show just brought awareness to the fact that no matter what people are going to have something to say about somebody, whether it is nice or not, based on their race or something else. In all Big Brother seasons that I have watched and for reality shows in general, you get a combination of people and someone is always going to be left out or feel alienated. Personally, I think it is because people are threatened by that individual so maybe some housemates felt threatened by Shilpa.

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This show reminds me of Extreme Makeover Home Edition in the U.S. I am constantly touched by the generosity of the people that come out and help these people that really could use the help. This is in no comparison with the reality shows that give a million dollars cash prize away to people that actually are living quite well if compared to others. There is reality TV that is strictly for entertainment purposes that really don’t educate anybody and there is reality TV that promotes change in someone’s life and in the world and this show in Iraq is one of them. The fact that the show in Iraq is not only rebuilding homes that were hit by bombs due to the War is good because people need to see the condition that a lot of Iraqis are living every day. Every state should film the horrible conditions that people are living in so that someone will take action and change things. The only way is to bring awareness and the more awareness the better. This is true REALITY!