Recent Comments

Melissa N Miller

Hi Alexandra!

It’s been my experience that many of the people who are directly impacted by Twilight fans (shopkeepers, motel/innkeepers, volunteers at the Chamber/Visitor’s Center, for example) have all been complimentary toward Stephenie Meyer and the notoriety that Twilight has thrust upon Forks. Of course, one might expect this kind of messaging from customer service professionals who want to make me feel good about my visit there and continue to spend my time and dollars in their town. However, I believe there is likely a kernel of truth to their statements — the town continues to host an annual “Stephenie Meyer Day” (recently rebranded as “Forever Twilight in Forks”) in honor of her and Twilight (which she has attended), and in this interview (http://vamped.org/2015/10/05/ten-years-of-twilight-visit-to-forks-washin...) the mayor states that he’s pleased she painted the town in a positive light. Still, that’s not to say I haven’t felt twinges of Twilight fatigue from community residents over the years. Tens of thousands of visitors to your town of 3000-4000 has got to be overwhelming after a while.

Meyer had never even visited Forks before publishing the first Twilight book - she just Googled “rainiest place in the US” and Forks was the lucky hit. While no one could have expected that Twilight would become such a success, it doesn’t negate that its popularity was a lot for the town to handle and they have really managed to take the whole thing in stride. But you are right that it begs the question of what she may owe them in return for accepting the monumental responsibility of acting as caretakers to a fandom that they didn’t ask for. The philanthropic opportunities that must exist in the small communities of Forks (and also neighboring La Push), are likely great. One would think someone of her capacity must be making contributions to these communities. But, no one is saying - if she is.

Gene Kelly's House, 725 North Rodeo Drive
Alexandra Edwards

Ahh, so the house is privately owned! Interesting…

Alexandra Edwards

This made me wonder as well if Stephenie Meyer has a responsibility to Forks, since she set her book there? How does the town view the (now very famous) woman who put them on the map?

Gene Kelly's House, 725 North Rodeo Drive
Kelli Marshall

Thanks, Alexandra! Yes, I know the names of the people who now live there, but I won’t dare list them here. :)

Gene Kelly's House, 725 North Rodeo Drive
Alexandra Edwards

This is fascinating! I’m intrigued by the idea of fans stopping by to “read” the house like a text that tells them about Kelly’s life. Do you know who owns the house now? I’m amazed that it hasn’t become an official attraction of some kind…

PBS - Kellyanne Conway
Roger Almendarez

Thank you for your post! I enjoyed your framing of “post truth” as “the cultural logic of late racism,” and I would venture further that this cultural logic extends beyond racism to various forms of oppression.

Although your post focuses specifically on how the concept of “post truth” interacted with voters of color, your linking of “post truth” to a cultural logic of oppression also invokes discussions of post-modern subjectivities.

As Jameson explained, Western Culture entered into a phase of “post-modernity” that de-centered the subject, leading to a crisis where “truth” became merely a relative position and not an apriori distinction. Chela Sandoval also greatly points out that this particular “post-modern” subjectivity is very similar to that experienced by post-colonial subjects.

That being said, post-modernity—in liberating the oppressed through the de-centering of power—inevitably led to our contemporary moment of “post-truth,” where hegemonic power re-captures dominance (ala Gramsci) by sanctioning the use of rhetorical tools like “alternative facts” that can co-exist alongside reason and established knowledge, legitimizing hypocritical and unreasonable positions.

I call this inevitable because, by de-essentializing “truth,” post-modernity sanctioned moral relativism and meta-modernist (http://www.metamodernism.org/, which I denigrate a selective post-modern philosophy, out of fear) conceptions of self-justified, personal “truths,” which can now been seen as having as much relative value as those truths espoused by more traditional forms of knowledge creation. However, I will admit that there is something liberating (albeit sinister and very Dennis the Menace-y) about not having to justify eating meat while believing in universal equality.

So, just as post-modernity promised freedom, it also paved the way for this moment of increasing oppression. Unfortunately, I think we’ve only just entered this particular phase and can expect the next 20 years to be replete with a bludgeoning force that authorizes”post truths,” furthering majority agendas and marginalizing the rest.

In the age of information, it appears that in popular culture it matters less what is “right” and “true” and matters more that we can find greater bulks of data. Being in a marginal subjective position myself (although, nowadays, who isn’t?), I propose a strategy of data dumping, where we oppose this dominating force by generating more, and more, and more information, including misinformation—just not in our scholarship or tax returns.

Matthew Thomas Payne

I don’t know exactly what to expect when I started the clip; I suppose something more akin to [adult swim]’s other late-night fare. I was struck (in a good way) by the animated video’s playfulness and its careful, mannered construction. It has a storyline of sorts without being necessarily “narrative.” I also dug the pulsing visuals that matched the beat of the music. So much of what appears on [as]’s late-night programming block reads as unfinished and exploratory. It’s nice to see an exacting and experimental work occupying that same space. Here’s hoping that Off the Air can continue to promote solid examples of animation style and technique.

Matthew Thomas Payne

I enjoy the way that so much of [adult swim]’s original programming—especially its stand-alone projects like “Too Many Cooks” or “This House Has People in It”—fully invests in its foundational, fictional conceits, only to ride them into the ground. This narrative self-destruction not only grants these texts with critical, meta-level layers of meaning (e.g., its fun to be media savvy and literate), but this technique also suggest a willingness to take an idea to its logical (or illogical conclusion). There is something pleasurable and gratifying about watching this quasi-punk rock aesthetic play out on basic cable.

Andrew Seroff

I didn’t really have the length to go into form or style (just narrative), but they are more than critical for the success of the short.

Andrew Seroff

Their narrative techniques fit well and are no doubt enhanced by the persona that Adult Swim employs and the form in which their content is distributed, especially in regards to getting attention from the media and fans.