Recent Comments

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Heather Lusty

This was an interesting video. I wonder if there’s a way to approach the symbiosis between ritual and the natural elements via Native American dancing (as a way to call forth the elements, talk to the gods, show respect for life forces) - which I know little to nothing about. It seems like many of the elements of pastiche the actress/singer displays here harness that type of connection to animistic culture. And, I wonder if Guy Debord’s theory of the spectacle gives some perspective on the form here - video, meant to be mass distributed for promoting the music. “a spectacle is generally understood as a “person or thing exhibited to, or set before, the public gaze as an object either (a) of curiosity or contempt, or (b) of marvel or admiration.” Such an exhibition is intended to form an “impressive or interesting show or entertainment for those viewing it.” Certainly applies to the outer framework - I wonder if that clouds the artist/director’s intention of the gaze. I guess the medium problematizes the ritual and the gaze, by nesting potential perspectives?

Heather Lusty

I’ll check out Montreal tonight. I think “doom metal” is pretty diverse in itself, and what Ghost is doing is a definite departure from the established schtick. I like the link to McLuhan; yes, the medium (music, occult, spectacle) influences how the message is perceived, to an extent, but I think on the level of parody. And (give word limits) - I don’t think that Ghost is just about parody. They’re really doing something unique in the genre, but not just to satirize organized religion. Their music is, by and large, inspirational and positive, and celebratory. It’s hard to fit them in to the more image-based micro-genres of metal because lyrically and musically they’re pretty “abby-normal” for the doom metal subset.

Heather Lusty

I think the focus is contemporary has shifted from anti-war rhetoric of the 60s to the global spread of consumerism, poverty, inhumanity, political corruption. Allows for the same type of critique, but the targets have changed. I like your use of decolonization - yes, in a sense, I think western Christianity’s influence has oppressed new legions of people - through the same strategies of cultural, educational, and linguistic dominance. It’s a good analogy.

Michael Frazer

I really enjoy the discussion here on occult imagery as inherently subversive. Hanging on my wall, I have indie pop band of Montreal’s album False Priest. It features a fish-headed man with a gas mask in presumably religious garb, all surrounded by images of religion (books, flaming hearts, stained glass, &c.), and war (guns and an army of other fishmen). Similar imagery appears on the cover of their album Satanic Panic in the Attic and onstage in performance. These inversions sound really similar to Ghost’s.

I’m curious your thoughts on genre in particular. As Ghost is doom metal and of Montreal indie pop, I find it interesting that they tackle the same thing to some extent. Obviously, different genres can achieve similar ends. Do you think that Ghost’s image is contingent in some part on the genre itself? Along the lines of Marshall McLuhan, is the genre/medium itself the message in this case?

I look forward to hearing your thoughts on this.

Kate Morgan

I like your analysis. It seems like occult imagery in music has never really left popular culture since the life and times of the Beatles, Page and Plant—and the ilk though it was often more subtly presented then.

Do you think there is still a connection between these anti-war forces and Ghost’s performances? Do you think some of it might be a cry for decolonization in the same way goddess worship and paganism grew out of the explorations of third wave feminisms and the “call” given to explore this type of symbolism by second wavers like Luce Irigaray?

Those might be complicated questions, I suppose. It might be just enough to enjoy the music and the deconstruction of institutions that people identify with some of the less authentic aspects of humanity.

Thanks for your thoughts.

JK Rowling's autograph
Cassie Brummitt
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Hi Lauren - thanks for reading and commenting, and also for the heads-up about the SWPACA. I’d love to attend in the future. I can see the overlap in our posts too; I think Rowling is so crucial not only to the creation of texts/experiences but also to how canon is perceived. Great to hear you’re using Barthes too - I’ve often wondered how he (and Foucault) would account for someone like Rowling, and for the entertainment industry of today!

JK Rowling's autograph
Cassie Brummitt
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Hi Amanda - thanks for reading and commenting. The Harry Potter universe is indeed such a cultural behemoth that I can see why she would seek to remain so entrenched in the world. I think her role provides a kind of security as well; in the face of other franchises that often face reboots or instability due to industrial forces, texts/experiences endorsed by Rowling are imbued by a sense of authenticity. I did submit a joint proposal to your book with my colleague Kieran Sellars, but on a different topic I’m currently working on (Cursed Child). Thanks!

JK Rowling's autograph
Cassie Brummitt
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Hi Emily - thanks for reading and commenting. Rowling’s taste-testing is one of my favourite examples of her complex and often bizarre authorial role! I agree that it’s interesting to consider what Rowling thinks about fan interventions and these fan-based challenges to her authority. I’ve been thinking about Cursed Child a lot lately, and it occurs to me that A Very Potter Musical offers an interesting fan-led comparison!

Screenshot of MoveOn.org's Harry Potter ad
Cassie Brummitt
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Hi Ashley - what a neat summation of the Trump-Voldemort links we’ve seen throughout the election season. Thanks for this. I appreciated your comments on how metaphors help us make sense of the world; and it occurred to me that aligning a real-life figure (Trump) with a fictional one (Voldemort, an arguably two-dimensional and sociopathic figure) reduces moral ambiguities and serves to polarise Clinton and Trump on opposite ends of the ‘good’ and ‘evil’, respectively. That links partly with Lauren’s points above.

I also thought your comments about the Trump-Voldemort connection as a ‘call to action’ were very interesting, especially considering the Harry Potter fandom’s prolific forms of fan activism through the likes of the Harry Potter Alliance.

Cassie Brummitt
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Hi Emily. This is a fascinating topic I’ve not thought too much about before, but it’s clearly an important one to consider. It’s interesting that sweets are mentioned (albeit briefly) in Cursed Child too, so there’s a continuing link there. Also, you can get hot Butterbeer at the Warner Bros Studio Tour in Watford, UK, during the winter, which really accords with your comments about butterbeer as comfort food. Have you written about these topics in greater detail anywhere else? Would be fascinating to read!