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JR Unframed

One of aspect of these types of works that fascinates me is how they draw communities into conversations about art, identity, and public space - conversations that seem heightened by the temporality of the works themselves. I’m reminded of a documentary from years ago showing town hall debates in a small Colorado farming community where Christo and Jeanne-Claude were preparing to construct their Valley Curtain piece in the 1970s. Regardless of the individual positions, it seems that the artists’ ability to evoke a debate about the function of art among the town’s residents constituted as much an achievement as the piece itself. I can see how JR’s project would have spawned a thousand unregarded conversations that might have never occurred otherwise.

JR Unframed
Sunny Stalter-Pace

These are such striking pieces of art! You weren’t kidding about scale. The Marseilles ones seemed especially striking to me because of the way they look like conventional wheat-paste posters, just blown up to enormous size. (True of the DC one in your Prezi too.) For me, these images seem to lose most of their context, or at least their referentiality. Instead, they make me think of Walter Benjamin’s idea that buildings are perceived by “tactile appropriation.” I think these JR pieces are perceived by people on their way from one place to another. They carry a trace of the original photo’s power, but that’s it.

Swagato Chakravorty

Hi Zara,

Thanks for your comments. There are other write-ups of Johansson disturbingly akin to Lane’s in tone and approach (they all seem to emphasize the peculiar blankness of Johansson’s affect), and yes, I do think that’s a key point when considering these recent films, since her body and its performance across these films both departs from and reacts against that “blankness.”

My thinking about corporeality and superficiality emerges out of some recent concerns: with architectural projection mapping on the one hand, and with contemporary French “cinéma du corps” on the other. I actually do think that the surface of media is in need of serious thinking—Giuliana Bruno’s recent book, “Surface,” begins exactly this project. Interestingly, your conflation (“body/screen/skin”) is something I’m working on in a separate project that has to do with architectural projection mapping, where the surface façade of architectural structures is treated as a fabric of sorts. There seems to be a slippage between fabric/screen/skin/surface that I’m not sure our current vocabulary can grasp. I think animation studies might also have something to say (think of motion capture systems that track sensors attached to the surface of the actor’s body, for example).

Alexandra Sastre

Edmond you raised really salient, critical questions, and think you’re spot on in your reference to the central polemic Dibbell brings up in his ethnography. I think too it is important to parse out how, within the universe of Her, bodies are related not only to sex (because certainly, you can have sex without bodies and the couple is shown doing so) but to a level of intimacy that is sexual and something more. This is the vector (call it romance perhaps?) that for me the film seems to render familiar, and depict in ways that are accessible to a contemporary audience, namely that love necessitates a certain cohesion of mind and body. Good food for thought!

Zara Dinnen

Hey Swagato. Exciting to read your take on these films and Johansson, and to know that there are people coming together to talk about them. I really like the way you draw attention to the work Lane’s profile does in capturing a particular mode of seeing Scarlett Johansson. This is definitely a reference I had in mind when thinking about “narrativising abstraction” in my post. These films know whose body they are working with and—especially in Under the Skin—put the process into play. Your question about corporeality and superficiality is really provocative: what do you think? Is there an emergent representational mode of body/skin/screen happening here?

Zara Dinnen

Hi Swagato— thanks! I have just read your entry. I’ll post a comment there too. In answer to why the emphasis on the face. I feel uneasy about having made this cut — separating the face from the body — but am interested in how this way of seeing the face as separate is an everyday event of digital culture. Although Johansson’s “blankness” is described as part of her “appeal”, this is (as you suggest) complicated by her specificity, her recognisability, her celebrity. I wanted to think about how this might also be the ambiguity of the face that is anonymously, blankly captured as big data (by surveillance cameras), but is always in a condition of awaiting recognition (by software, or by selfie).

Edmond Chang

I have not (yet) seen Her, but I think the questions and problems you raise echo what I thought when I first saw the trailers. I wonder, though, given my limited knowledge of the film whether or not it is actually trying to divorce the mind from the body or the mind from the *right* body. I wonder too if Samantha’s surrogate were designed by Theo or by Samantha herself (or virtual a la a holodeck) if there would be said failure of intimacy. The surrogate body is clearly not the right body for Theo (and do you even need a body to have “sex”). Just thinking along here. It reminds me of Julian Dibbell’s “A Rape in Cyberspace” and of the fraught relationship between our conceptions of mind/body.

Edmond Chang

A very interesting week with some really great posts and provocations. I wonder about how far the idea of “radical” + posthuman + woman is taken by the texts this week (and how far we are willing to take things). I would say that the problem with most imaginings of the “post” often gets recuperated in order to protect and privilege a legible human (and in our case woman). In other words, I am interested in the posthuman that might get read as nonhuman and what is useful about that radicality, queerness, nonnormativity.

Swagato Chakravorty

So many interesting points here, Jason. My comments:

1. You make a great point about LUCY’s titular character representing the far end of post-humanization. Indeed, I can’t really see an alternative interpretation, since Lucy does literally disintegrate and take up a new form of existence as something omnipresent, perhaps even omniscient. However, and following from this in fact, I’m not sure why we should insist that the process of post-humanization, or “becoming post-human,” should continually seek new *physical* medium(s). Is it not, instead, that we’re striving to shrug off the impairments of physical existence? Should we not read Lucy’s disintegration as a gesture that underscores the very limitations of her human body? I guess what I’m saying is that I have trouble seeing why physicality is a necessity.

2. I think your point about representations of this process resembling depictions of madness is an excellent one. WJT Mitchell at the University of Chicago offered a course not too long ago, titled “Seeing Madness,” which explored historical representations of madness. And there is of course a long history of madness as simply a marker of (extreme) Otherness. Often, such radically Other bodies were imbued with superhuman qualities. They were also considered to be capable of communing with the divine, or with devils. The character of Renfield in Bram Stoker’s Dracula comes to mind.

So, to sum up: On the one hand, I think it’s a useful idea to consider insanity and sanity as existing along a spectrum rather than as an opposed pair (in fact, much recent work in psychology also tends toward such thinking). In this context, we might consider a more positive inflection to representations of madness. On the other hand, I wonder how far we can reasonably push this line of thinking. Reconfiguration must operate within certain stable parameters, or else it simply leads to chaos. If we understand madness, transports of passion, and other such tropes to capably represent the process of becoming post-human, how do we take care that it doesn’t confuse itself with the non-human? Or, ultimately, is one identical to the other?

Swagato Chakravorty

This is fascinating, Zara. My own contribution this week (to show up Thursday) looks at the surface of Johansson’s body as it figures across these recent films. That makes me wonder what you make of your post’s emphasis on her face. In other words, how does the (rest of her) body figure into your consideration of her face? Or, let’s say, of sur-faciality. I also wonder whether Balazs may have anything to contribute to this conversation. Finally, what of Johansson’s position in the popular imaginary? Her alleged blankness of (facial) affect has long been identified as somehow crucial to her sexual appeal. Is that included in how you take these films to “narrativise abstraction”?