Recent Comments

February 14, 2017 - 19:34

I really liked your post regarding your critique on the taken-for-granted attitude that has resulted due to political activism in digital spaces. Also, the article on big data and data analytics strategies was interesting because of the data-driven approach that helped Donald Trump winning the election. I am questioning myself here how we, the people, are manipulated by big data and also point to the same argument you make: people need to be careful with their usage of the internet! We should rely on the information that comes from people who work in these areas.

Most likely, I would have enjoyed your class in which you asked the students to identify fake news. Not only does the constant increase of data collection have a big impact on economics and politics, to some extent, it also distributes social and political goods. Trumps’ strategy of targeted facebook ads was a success that was enabled by big data analytics.

We need to question our sources and pay attention to what is said and not immediately believe in all the stuff that is written. We should read our sources with a sensible eye, therefore, remain humble.    

February 14, 2017 - 00:46

The author mentions the accessibility of online archives such as the commons creates a dynamic set of media that can be remixed, appropriated, drawn from, or extended in a creative practice. To explain her idea, she brings an example of iOS application: Women of EL Toro in which you can hear voices of women and create the historical and educational atmosphere, while you are offline. This is a real innovation that not only entertains individuals but indeed, increases individuals’ knowledge. As women, I am so excited to try this application. That sounds so cool. And to me, this method could be one of the best ways of an education system. It is a great idea to create different applications which use online data in different fields, then recover and remix them to educate people. I am very optimist about this method, because nowadays most of the people get their news, direction, temperature, etc., via cell phone. That would be great if we have more of this kind of educational application.    

February 13, 2017 - 20:19

Unfortunately, I do not have an iPhone, otherwise I would have checked how the app The Women of El Toro is like. I liked how the app implements digitized archives to engage the audience with an offline facility. I strongly believe that you are right saying that the accessibility of online archives are useful sources to start from and create something that is unique and special. I can imagine how it is an interesting experience to listen to women’s voices and create an atmosphere that is educational but also of historical significance.

The work that you put in to create an app that offers a reality tour, e.g. reading one thousand pages of interview transcripts, leaves me again the impression how closely related offline and online realities are. I think that it is a great idea to implement women’s voices into the park and using a different method to give visitors some information and something they maybe talk about. As we have seen, archived material is definitely useful for such an idea. Maybe this archived material is even more interesting to the public because it gives the people something they did not think of before, or narratives that sound spectacular and comprehensible. 

February 10, 2017 - 22:51

I understand how easy it is to get caught up in fake news. If we see something that agrees with what we are thinking, of course, we want that validation and may seek it without actually thinking about the sources. However, I do not think that fake news is the only problem. Cable news networks allow us to pick and choose what information we want to see and whose viewpoints we want to hear. Gone are the days that news had to present both sides of the issue they are reporting. For this reason, news is no longer fair and balanced. Even stations that claim to be (fair and balanced) have a bias. I don't know how we combat that without teaching individuals to critique the sources they are reading and investigate to find out if it is true. While we all want to think that we do these things, there are times that we take short cuts and believe a story before we should. However, I feel we do this with research also.  Do we really stop to think about the sources we are using for our resources?  Even if they are peer reviewed - they can still hold biases depending on who wrote them, when they were written, and the interests of those involved. It is important to stop for just a moment and use these same considerations on our work. Are we actually looking at it from all angles, taking into account all the things we should?  Maybe that is how we found ourselves in this problem with fake news after all.  It is far too easy to just take someone's word for it, especially if we feel they are smarter or more knowledgeable on a subject.  We should never be afraid to question EVERYTHING!! 

February 10, 2017 - 18:05

I enjoy reading this thoughtful idea. This is a teacher’s idea who really concerns about student educational progress. In the past, she preferred that her students be taken apart from social medias; she thought that they dedicate a significant portion of their daily time to social medias. But, sometimes about last year, she has changed her mind when she realized that based on survey most of American get some part of their news through social medias and many of them such as Facebook which works base on Algorithm can distribute a fake or biased news. This fake news caused individuals cannot see the reality. Thus, she came to an idea that it is good to teach our students to read news critically and analyzed them. Students should know that each news has a creator which might have some unconscious biases or sometimes creator might have lost some viewpoints. Students should also realize an important role that power play in creating a news and try to confirm it from other resources.  I think all these comments very useful, but a little hard to really teach to every single student to read critically or find out the biases inside the news. Because it is possible that some students have the same bias as the creator of news has. Thus, they really cannot understand the bias. I think confirming the news with other sources is a better idea. But, the important point is media scholars should attempt to optimize their use of this online sphere to inform other individuals about different issues such as politics, social, etc.      

February 10, 2017 - 18:04

I enjoy reading this thoughtful idea. This is a teacher’s idea who really concerns about student educational progress. In the past, she preferred that her students be taken apart from social medias; she thought that they dedicate a significant portion of their daily time to social medias. But, sometimes about last year, she has changed her mind when she realized that based on survey most of American get some part of their news through social medias and many of them such as Facebook which works base on Algorithm can distribute a fake or biased news. This fake news caused individuals cannot see the reality. Thus, she came to an idea that it is good to teach our students to read news critically and analyzed them. Students should know that each news has a creator which might have some unconscious biases or sometimes creator might have lost some viewpoints. Students should also realize an important role that power play in creating a news and try to confirm it from other resources.  I think all these comments very useful, but a little hard to really teach to every single student to read critically or find out the biases inside the news. Because it is possible that some students have the same bias as the creator of news has. Thus, they really cannot understand the bias. I think confirming the news with other sources is a better idea. But, the important point is media scholars should attempt to optimize their use of this online sphere to inform other individuals about different issues such as politics, social, etc.      

February 9, 2017 - 16:15

I personally liked how Dr. Phillips implemented Twitter as social media outlet as an effective way to engage in conversation and participate in online spaces. I strongly believe that the variety of methods Twitter is offering plays a major role in engaging the right audience. Sharing information to the public and making it accessible to the right people is important.

Participating in chats, connect with colleagues and communities using the same hashtag, retweeting posts from people of the personal network, or posting a picture of what Is going on in class are certainly good ways to share knowledgeable messages to the right audience. In my opinion, the focus should lie on the audience and what they make out of these posts. Dr. Philips does a great job in implementing these strategies. The lines between both online and physical engagement are more and more blurring. Therefore, sharing interesting Twitter posts during a conference for the people who are not present is a supporting way to engage the interested virtual audience for offline topics.

To my mind, the key term in using social media tools effectively is consistency. As a media scholar, nothing is wrong with posting the progress in a group project. Especially for the youth, I think that posts like these are encouraging and animating. Still, the way we share information or engage in the online conversation should fit to the audience. Therefore, taking on a flexible role in online interaction is elementary. 

February 9, 2017 - 16:03

Twitter is a very useful social networking tool and Nathan Philips is taking advantages of all the uses Twitter has to offer. Twitter is a tool to connect with other and to express yourself in 140 characters. In his video one main way Nathan Philips is using his twitter is to connect with colleagues and community. He does this by following groups and Twitter accounts of his interests or ones that he works with. He also connects with colleagues by simply tagging then with the @ symbol follow by their account names on other tweets or articles that he likes to share directly with them. Another way Nathan Philips can do this if it is more of a private matter than a public tweet is to Direct Message the person he would like to privately communicate with. It is similar to messaging on Facebook rather than writing it on your status or a wall post. 

Nathan Philips also uses his Twitter to share what's happening in classes which is also good to share especially if his followers are within the same networks to be inspire or updated on his classes. Not only does he share what is happening in class but he also live tweet during conferences and other presentation events. I think that is a great idea and it is the popular trend right now. Live tweeting allows people who couldn't attend a chance to still know what is going on. The only problem with this is that it can be bias and he can't really tweet everything that is said or happening at these events. So another way to improve on live tweeting is maybe a live stream of the event, which he can do through Facebook and maybe tweet out that he will be live streaming through Facebook. Sharing the ongoing collaborations, day to day work process, upcoming events for youth, teachers, and researcher which is a great way to keep his network updated if they are collaborating and working with him. He also shares publications, showcase UIC college of Education work, grad student, and faculty. Finally he also read, watch and learn which is what many also do on Twitter, so I think that Nathan Philips is using Twitter to the fullest. 

February 9, 2017 - 09:37

It’s interesting, Gramsci wrote about “organic intellectuals”— everyday people who are not deemed by society to be an intellectual or knowledge expert — and how they have knowledge value and speak the “truth” more so than those holding positions of “knowledge expert.” I really gravitated toward that idea with the advent of social media and how it gives voice to those organic intellectuals who create “real” content and have greater participatory parity with the media and intellectual elite in creating a more robust and accurate national discourse. With every video shared on social media about the injustices happening in our society, I felt those organic intellectuals were getting closer and closer to holding real power in influencing change for a better society. For instance, the Black Lives Matter movement’s success in influencing discourse was due to content that told the real story of what was/is happening to many Black Americans. Once people saw the injustices being served, there wasn’t much debate—as a whole, the elite intellectuals verified that content to be “true.” But now, an interesting phenomenon is happening in America. Previously-deemed knowledge experts are being devalued by those in political power and “counter organic intellectuals” are scoffing at verifiable content or facts. They are elevating a perspective that values belief systems above fact. We seem to be approaching a Fahrenheit 451 moment in history, where all prior knowledge and rational, critical thought is burned to the ground.

Citations

Jones, Steve. Antonio Gramsci. n.p.: London ; New York : Routledge, c2006., 2006.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit_451

February 8, 2017 - 21:37

When I think about the process of social engagement in shared communities of common interests, one of the main obstacles for the participants is determining when the engagement is warranted. Upon reading the statement, "If one of my primary objectives as a scholar-researcher is to offer meaningful analyses to the widest possible audience, I have a responsibility to make my work accessible, in terms of medium and in terms of readability." I agree that as a scholar there is a sort of responsibility to reach the masses and incorporate knowledgeable information that will augment the conversation/information being shared. However, the task then also falls on the scholar to determine when and on what platforms their expertise are required and/or needed. Furthermore, the scholar is then given the daunting task to convince the audience of their legitimacy and convince them that they are solely here to advance the conversation rather than combat others in order to produce a positive consequence.

I do believe that "the scholar can play a critical role in positively developing the communities about which we care," but only if the agenda of the scholar is welcomed into the community. I propose that because there is a strong shared interest, offering information to someone who doesn't comprehend or accept it, may have a counter effect and end up producing a negative outcome. On the contrary, my personal belief is that it would be beneficial for scholars to offer their expertise in group's of producers, writers, journalists, and less educated participators/the commons. I feel that it could ultimately lead to less unprecedented information and we could experience the unraveling of more fact based, research proven claims. However, being an avid user of social media platforms/interest based communities, I have noticed a sort of trend for the masses to be more opinion based driven than fact information seeking individuals. In conclusion, understanding what role should be played in the community in which one is interacting is key and roles could change depending on the audience.