Zigzigger

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The Television Image and the Image of the Television

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Mad Men Class

In the past few weeks I have begun to teach an independent study with Lynn Reed, a student in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies at Skidmore College program. The topic is Mad Men: Serialized Television Narrative and Depictions of Social History in the Early 1960s (link is to the class blog). ... read more »

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Indie Promotion

The Columbia University Press website has published some of my work online, and I just wanted to alert those of you not following my every thought and link on twitter to these two items:

1. Indie’s introduction has been posted for all to see. It begins: ... read more »

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Indie: An American Film Culture

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Free TV? Television File-Sharing, Media Convergence and Cultural Status

I gave this paper on Saturday at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies conference in New Orleans. It’s an elaboration of some ideas I wrote awhile back in Flow. I have been researching this topic for a couple of years and the 2011 conference gave me the opportunity to turn it into something more substantial; there’s a longer version soon to be submitted to a journal. This is work in progress, and your comments are welcome. ... read more »

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Faves, 2010

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"The Attention-Span Myth"

Virginia Heffernan contacted me a couple of weeks ago abouth a piece she was writing on attention spans. She asked if I would answer some emailed questions and I said sure. ... read more »

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Book Time

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I would get her so pregnant

Pete Campbell: I’m going to be a father.
His father-in-law: Can you believe it?
Mad Men viewers: uh, yeah!

Irony is one of Mad Men’s most indispensible storytelling strategies. Irony is at home in many kinds of storytelling, but Quality TV benefits from one of the most essential effects of ironic narration: it requires that we “get it.” It exploits the audience’s special knowledge and competence, which the text flatters us for having. ... read more »

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